“ArtNation,” hosted by “Yellowstone” star Denim Richards, debuts on Smithsonian

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Denim Richards, an actor on the hit Paramount Network show “Yellowstone,” is celebrating the arts by hosting the Smithsonian Channel series “ArtNation,” a one-hour blend of interviews with artists from around the world and classic profiles from CBS News’ “CBS Sunday Morning” and “60 Minutes.”

“What makes ‘ArtNation’ special is the fact that it celebrates the arts in disciplines from singing, acting, dancing, sculpting, concert piano, and the list goes on and on,” said Richards. “I truly believe that this show also provides an amazing platform to new and aspiring artists, not just in the U.S., but all over the world. This show is a breath of fresh air, and there is an artist or story that everyone that watches will be able to resonate with.”

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The Smithsonian Channel’s new series “ArtNation,” features interviews with artists from across the globe.

Smithsonian Channel


Along with the classic CBS News segments, Richards profiles local working artists to explore their inspirations and to provide a fresh look into the creatives who make everyone see the world a little differently.

Airing Tuesdays at 10 p.m. ET/PT, “ArtNation” episodes are organized by themes, from “Americana” to “Ambition” to “Rebels.” The new eight-part series includes interviews with EGOT winner Viola Davis, ballet dancer Misty Copeland, designers Ralph Lauren and Betsey Johnson, actors Nicole Kidman and Daniel Craig, author Stephen King and director Spike Lee.

“What I am excited about on ‘ArtNation’ is having the opportunity to bring so many amazing artists to TV screens all around the world,” Richards said. “There are so many amazing stories to share, and I am honored to get to share these stories with the world.” 

Richards said each of the profiled artists had to overcome significant challenges. 

“For some, it was not having a strong support system, others struggled with depression, many even felt somewhat outcasted or misunderstood from society because they were ‘different’ or had made mistakes in their past,” he said. “Yet, through it all, they managed to overcome all of the obstacles and negativity and turned it into beautiful works of art that we all now get to take part in. Many artists go through struggles alone and yet share their gifts and blessings with the world. This is why I love ‘ArtNation.'”


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